Skip to main content

TAU lab identifies effective antibodies from recovered Coronavirus patients

Written on |

Antibody-based therapies can be used to protect at-risk populations, including medical workers, from the virus

The race to develop effective antibody-based treatments for COVID-19 is advancing at a rapid pace. Now, a Tel Aviv University laboratory reports it has successfully isolated two antibodies that would neutralize the virus’s ability to infect human cells. The two suitable antibodies were identified in patients recovering from COVID-19, according to Dr. Natalia Freund who heads the Laboratory for Human Antibody Responses at TAU’s Sackler Faculty of Medicine. “The use of antibodies bears significant potential as a treatment for high-risk coronavirus patients and as a preventative measure for at-risk groups, like medical workers and essential employees, exposed to the virus,” she explains.

The weak link in the virus chain

In the long run, identifying effective antibodies against virus neutralization could also accelerate the development of vaccines for the disease. Dr. Freund, who together with her team pinpointed the antibodies in blood samples of recovering patients, say that antibodies would be key to identifying the elusive vulnerable Achilles’ heel of the virus, which scientists have identified as somewhere along its spike protein, the structure that allows it to break into a cell. Dr. Freund is collaborating with researchers in San Diego to test the efficacy of antibody treatments in animal models against a live active virus. The trials are scheduled to take place this month. Only if and when the trials are successful in animal models will the option of clinical trials be considered. “If we complete the trials successfully and are able to eventually develop this treatment, it could be used to help treat at-risk patients such as the elderly or immunocompromised patients. Antibodies can also remain active in the blood for many weeks – up to two months – so injecting antibodies can afford medical teams and other at-risk groups temporary protection against the virus.”

Related posts

Will Existing Drugs Stop Cancer’s Bone Spread?

19 May 2024

Heart Disease’s Cancer Link Unveiled

14 April 2024

Do Green Environments Help Heart Patients Live Longer?

4 April 2024

TAU Receives $12.67M Grant for Medical Simulation Center

1 April 2024

Breaking the MedTech Glass Ceiling

27 March 2024

Summer Glow: How Sun Exposure Boosts Fertility in Women Ages 30-40

7 March 2024

Are We Close to Ending Alzheimer’s Memory Loss?

15 February 2024

Destroying Cancer: new drug delivery system containing RNA therapy can target cancer cells in bone marrow

31 July 2023

Stress Makes Vaccines Less Effective

26 July 2023

Researchers Induce Cancer Cell “Suicide”

17 July 2023

Metabolomics – A New Frontier in Preventive Medicine

13 July 2023

Older Bats do Suffer from Age-related Hearing Loss

13 July 2023

Operation Guardian of the Walls: Women, Young People and Residents of the South Paid the Heaviest Price

12 July 2023

Discovery May Lead to Personalized Medicine for Infectious Diseases

12 July 2023

One Third of Normal-Weight Individuals are Obese

12 July 2023

Breakthrough Gene Therapy Offers Hope for Severe Developmental Epilepsy in Children

27 June 2023

Victoria

Tok Corporate Centre, Level 1,
459 Toorak Road, Toorak VIC 3142
Phone: +61 3 9296 2065
Email: [email protected]

New South Wales

Level 22, Westfield Tower 2, 101 Grafton Street, Bondi Junction NSW 2022
Phone: +61 418 465 556
Email: [email protected]

Western Australia

P O Box 36, Claremont,
WA  6010
Phone: :+61 411 223 550
Email: [email protected]